Essential Oils For Addictions

  • Useful Essential Oils

    Which essential oils are effective for addictions?


    As explained in the video, the essential oils in the following product have traditionally been used for cravings and addictions:

    • Quit Craving Roll-On Relief – When you experience cravings, take a moment to sit, close your eyes and focus your attention on where the craving is most present in your body. It could be in your chest, your throat, or anywhere. Then roll it on directly to those areas. Roll it on your pulse points, temples and heart area as well. Take a moment to experience the aroma. Take the experience of the aroma to the place where you feel the craving. Note: Do not ingest it.

    It contains the following essential oils along with other aromatherapy products: Helichrysum, Pink Grapefruit, Black Pepper, Clove Bud, Spearmint, Lime and Bitter Orange.

    Although it isn't mentioned in the video, if you like diffusing essential oils, you may prefer to use:

    • Quit Craving Synergy – To use it, diffuse three times per day for 30 minutes. To ease cravings on-the-go when a diffuser is not available, inhale directly from the bottle. Ideally, when an urge comes up, close your eyes, inhale the aroma from the bottle and take the experience of the aroma to the place in your body where you feel the urge. Do this for several minutes until the urge subsides. Note: For diffusion only. Do not use on the skin. Avoid use if you have epilepsy or hypertension or are pregnant.


    This video is by the founder of Amrita Aromatherapy and master aromatherapist Christoph Streicher, Ph.D.


    For other issues, see Essential Oils To Balance Emotions.

    Learn more about aromatherapy or see our how to use essential oil videos.


    Disclaimer: The statements made on this page have not been evaluated by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). They are not intended to diagnose, cure or prevent any disease. If a condition persists, please contact your physician or healthcare provider. The information provided is not a substitute for a face-to-face consultation with a healthcare provider, and should not be construed as medical advice.


  • About the Condition

    What are addictions?

    Addictions are activities which are generally pleasurable but which lead to physical and/or psychological withdrawal symptoms when you stop doing them. You can be addicted to a particular substance or to an activity. Continued use of the addictive substance or activity can lead to damaging effects on the body or soul. It is generally accompanied by a feeling of not being in control or being dependent on something.

    What causes addictions?

    In terms of a physical addiction, some substances are known to cross the blood-brain barrier, and to alter the chemical balance of the brain (e.g. alcohol, cigarettes and some pharmaceutical and illegal drugs do this).

    In terms of psychological addictions, sometimes a habit becomes an addiction when the person no longer feels in control.

    The causes are not clear and obviously many factors may be involved (e.g. physical, mental, emotional and circumstantial). There is some speculation that there is a genetic component that increases the likelihood of someone becoming addicted to certain substances.


    Disclaimer: The statements made on this page have not been evaluated by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). They are not intended to diagnose, cure or prevent any disease. If a condition persists, please contact your physician or healthcare provider. The information provided is not a substitute for a face-to-face consultation with a healthcare provider, and should not be construed as medical advice.

  • Other Treatments

    What are conventional medical treatments for addictions?

    There can be one on one psychological therapy or group therapy in an out-patient setting or in a residential setting. Of course, there are a wide variety of psychological therapies. Some people benefit from self-help groups such as Alcoholics Anonymous. It should be noted that some groups like Weight Watchers are not non-profits.


    The withdrawal symptoms for some addictive substances can be severe and that is why having trained doctors and nurses on hand is recommended.

    Sometimes doctors recommend the use of replacement drugs (e.g. methadone in place of heroin) as part of the treatment process. But often this leads to continued physical dependence, but just on another more regulated substance.

    Some people decide to stop the addiction suddenly (this is often termed "cold turkey"). Others prefer to gradually decrease the negative activity or intake of the substance.

    What are alternative treatments for addictions?

    Generally the person has to commit themselves to making major changes to their lifestyle to support positive changes. Because a lifestyle change is often beneficial, some people find that by improving a person's diet, doing more exercise and meditation techniques can help. Sometimes adopting a new healthy lifestyle can simply not leave room for old negative addictive habits that may have previously been in place like over-eating. Naturopaths and Ayurvedic consultants may help in this regard. Stress-reducing therapies such as massage can also be a useful addition.

    Of course, essential oils traditionally have also been used for addictions. For more information, see the Useful Essential Oils tab.

    Disclaimer: The statements made on this page have not been evaluated by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). They are not intended to diagnose, cure or prevent any disease. If a condition persists, please contact your physician or healthcare provider. The information provided is not a substitute for a face-to-face consultation with a healthcare provider, and should not be construed as medical advice.


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