Essential Oils For Bursitis

  • Useful Essential Oils

    Which essential oils are effective for bursitis?


    The following essential oils have traditionally been used for bursitis:

    • Helichrysum – dilute it 2% in a penetrating carrier oil (10 drops per tablespoon) before applying it to affected areas
    • German Chamomile – dilute it 3% in jojoba or hazelnut oil (15 drops per tablespoon) before applying it to affected areas.


    Learn more about aromatherapy
    or see our how to use essential oil videos.


    Disclaimer: The statements made on this page have not been evaluated by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). They are not intended to diagnose, cure or prevent any disease. If a condition persists, please contact your physician or healthcare provider. The information provided is not a substitute for a face-to-face consultation with a healthcare provider, and should not be construed as medical advice.

  • About the Condition

    What Is Bursitis?


    Bursitis is condition where the bursa (a sac filled with lubricating fluid) is inflamed or irritated. The bursa is found between tissues such as bone, muscle, tendons, and skin. When it is functioning correctly, it decreases rubbing, friction, and irritation. Bursitis can be experienced as pain (gradual or sudden) in the shoulder, elbow, hip, knee or Achilles tendon. It is more likely to be sudden and severe pain if calcium deposits are present. In the shoulder, it can lead to a loss of motion (adhesive capsulitis). This is also known as “frozen shoulder.”


    What Causes Bursitis?

    Bursitis can be caused by injury to the area, but generally it is caused by repetitive use or overuse of a joint. The older you are (e.g. over 40 years of age), the more likely you are to suffer from it, because when tendons age, they become more rigid and less elastic and more likely to tear. If you don’t stretch before and after exercise sessions or sports, or if you slip into poor postures, you are more likely to experience it.

    Any unusual configuration (e.g. having differences in the length of each of your legs) can add more stress on the physiology and make you more likely to suffer from bursitis. Stress, infections or suffering from other conditions like arthritis, gout or thyroid disorders can also increase your likelihood of suffering from it. Some medications can increase your risk of getting it.

    You should consult a doctor if you also have a fever as this could indicate that you also have an infection or if there is swelling, redness, warmth or multiple sites of pain or if you are unable to move the joint.


    Disclaimer: The statements made on this page have not been evaluated by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). They are not intended to diagnose, cure or prevent any disease. If a condition persists, please contact your physician or healthcare provider. The information provided is not a substitute for a face-to-face consultation with a healthcare provider, and should not be construed as medical advice.

  • Other Treatments

    What Are Conventional Medical Treatments For Bursitis?


    Generally your doctor will advise you to avoid activities that tend to aggravate your bursitis (e.g. gardening or tennis), to rest the affected joint and to apply a cloth-covered ice pack on the day of the injury. Sometimes they will also prescribe over-the-counter anti-inflammatory medicines. Like all medications, these too have side effects.

    If your bursitis doesn’t reduce in a week’s time, your doctor may also prescribe corticosteroids to decrease the inflammation and pain. Sometimes, they are injected. These medications come with the risk of severe side effects.

    Physical therapy can be recommended (e.g. range-of-motion exercises and splints).

    Surgery is sometimes performed when bursitis does not respond to the other treatment options.


    What Are Alternative Treatments For Bursitis?

    Some say taking apple cider vinegar and temporarily changing your diet to more acidic foods may help decrease the accumulation of calcium in your joints. Others say avoiding processed foods and eating a good organic diet with lots of greens helps.

    Apparently, calcium supplements are generally not the cause of calcium deposits. In fact, it is more likely to be that you were deficient in calcium, so your body took calcium from the bones and it ended up in the joint.

    Others say that rubbing the joint with DMSO (dimethylsulfoxide) or warm castor oil may help. Acupuncture can be used to relieve the pain.

    Of course, there are essential oils that many find helpful. See the Useful Essential Oils tab for details.


    Disclaimer: The statements made on this page have not been evaluated by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). They are not intended to diagnose, cure or prevent any disease. If a condition persists, please contact your physician or healthcare provider. The information provided is not a substitute for a face-to-face consultation with a healthcare provider, and should not be construed as medical advice.

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