Essential Oils For Sleep And Insomnia

  • Useful Essential Oils

    Which essential oils are effective for sleep and insomnia?


    As explained in the video, the aromatherapy essential oil product which may temporarily help with the symptoms of sleep disorders is:

    • Deep Rest Roll-On Relief – If you can't sleep, focus your attention on your body to locate any restlessness. It could be in your arms or legs; it could be anywhere. Roll on the lotion wherever you feel this energetic block that won’t let you sleep. Roll it on your pulse points, temples and heart area as well. It will penetrate the skin to soothe any restlessness. Smelling the aromatic oils will heighten the effect. It contains essential oils of Red Mandarine, Lavender Extra, Sweet Marjoram and Mandarine Petitgrain and other therapeutic ingredients. Note: Do not use during pregnancy.

    Although it isn't mentioned in this video, you may like to try Deep Rest Synergy – Diffuse it or dilute it 3% in any carrier oil (15 drops per tablespoon) and apply on the heart, chest and head areas, or dilute it and use it in an aromatic bath. Note: Do not use during pregnancy.

    You may also find this essential oil sleep blend useful. If you suffer from snoring issues, you may find this page about Essential oils for snoring useful.


    This video is by the founder of Amrita Aromatherapy and master aromatherapist Christoph Streicher, Ph.D.

    Learn more about aromatherapy or see our how to use essential oil videos.


    Disclaimer: The statements made on this page have not been evaluated by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). They are not intended to diagnose, cure or prevent any disease. If a condition persists, please contact your physician or healthcare provider. The information provided is not a substitute for a face-to-face consultation with a healthcare provider, and should not be construed as medical advice.


  • About the Condition

    What is insomnia? What are sleep disorders?


    Insomnia is a reoccurring inability to get sufficient deep and satisfying sleep. It can take many forms. Some people find it hard to fall asleep. Other find it hard to stay asleep or to go back to sleep after having gotten up during the night. Most people who suffer from insomnia don't feel fresh when they get up, and this affects their ability to function properly during the day.

    Some people need less sleep than others. But most people need seven to eight hours a night. One way to test if you are getting enough sleep is to remove any stimulants (e.g. coffee) and to check if you still feel energetic and awake during the day.

    What is insomnia? What causes sleep disorders?

    Sometimes insomnia can be as a result of another medical condition or a side effect of a medication. If these causes are not factors, then it could be due to factors such as:

    • Anxiety
    • Stress
    • Depression
    • Changes in your schedule or environment (e.g. travel or working night shift can disrupt your circadian rhythms and sleep cycle)
    • Poor sleep routines (e.g. trying to sleep at irregular hours, exposing yourself to too much stimulation before bed, an uncomfortable bed or too warm a room or associating your bedroom with work rather than sleep if you tend to use it as an office)
    • Eating too or too soon before bed, making it hard to sleep because your body is working on digestion. Some also experience heartburn and acidity which can make it hard to sleep.
    • Using stimulants such as caffeine, alcohol, nicotine or other drugs. Many people mistakenly think that drinking alcohol will help them sleep, but they aren't aware that it also prevents them from experiencing the deeper stages of sleep and can sometimes lead to waking up during the night.

    Disclaimer: The statements made on this page have not been evaluated by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). They are not intended to diagnose, cure or prevent any disease. If a condition persists, please contact your physician or healthcare provider. The information provided is not a substitute for a face-to-face consultation with a healthcare provider, and should not be construed as medical advice.


  • Other Treatments

    What are conventional medical treatments for sleep disorders?


    Doctors generally try to work out if there are any underlying causes for your insomnia or if there are faulty sleep habits that can be addressed. Only if these behavioral modifications don't work, do they prescribe medications.

    Behavior modifications include:

    • Establishing good sleeping habits such as a regular sleep schedule, avoiding stimulation before bed, and reserving your bedroom for just sleep and keeping it at a good temperature.
    • Cognitive behavioral therapy to help control or eliminate negative thoughts and worries that may be stopping you from sleeping.
    • Relaxation techniques such as progressive muscle relaxation, biofeedback and breathing techniques.
    • Temporarily restricting sleep (i.e. partial sleep deprivation) to make you more tired the next night.
    • Remaining passively awake (i.e. paradoxical intention) to stop you worrying about not sleeping or expecting to fall asleep.
    • Light therapy via a medical-grade light box can be useful (e.g. if you fall asleep too early and then awaken too early) to reset your internal clock.

    Sleeping pills generally are not recommended for more than a few weeks, although there are several medications approved for long-term use. As with all medications, there are side effects to using such drugs.

    What are alternative treatments for insomnia?

    Although sometimes the safety and effectiveness of alternative treatments have not been proven, some people have found these things useful:

    • Melatonin supplement. This is a chemical that is naturally produced by the body in increasing amounts starting at dusk and tapering off toward the morning. It's generally considered safe to try for a few weeks, but the long-term safety is unknown.
    • Valerian is a herbal remedy that has a mildly sedating effect. Discuss this with your doctor before trying it, as sometimes, when it is used in high doses or used long term, it can increase the risk of liver damage. There can sometimes be withdrawal symptoms if you stop using it.
    • Acupuncture. There is some evidence that this can be beneficial for people with insomnia. Ask your doctor how to find a qualified practitioner.
    • Yoga. Some research suggests that yoga (when practiced on a regular basis) can help improve sleep quality. But always start slowly and find an instructor that can work with your limitations.
    • Meditation. Research studies suggest that some forms of meditation (along with the conventional behavioral modifications) may help improve sleep. It may also have other positive health effects, such as reducing stress and lowering blood pressure.

    Of course, essential oils traditionally have been used to improve sleep. See the Useful Essential Oils tab for more information.


    Disclaimer: The statements made on this page have not been evaluated by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). They are not intended to diagnose, cure or prevent any disease. If a condition persists, please contact your physician or healthcare provider. The information provided is not a substitute for a face-to-face consultation with a healthcare provider, and should not be construed as medical advice.

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