Essential Oils For Excessive Perspiration / Sweating

  • Useful Essential Oils

    Which essential oils are effective for excessive perspiration / sweating?


    As explained in the video, the following products and oils are said to be cooling. These essential oils have also traditionally been used to curb excessive perspiration/sweating:


    Cooling oils:

    • Lemon Essential Oil – Dilute to a maximum of 2% in any carrier oil (10 drops per tablespoon) and apply to the skin.
    • Lime Essential Oil – Dilute to a maximum of 2% in any carrier oil (10 drops per tablespoon) and apply to the skin.
    • Peppermint Essential Oil – Dilute to 1-2% in in any carrier oil (5 to 10 drops per tablespoon) and apply to the skin.
    • Pine Essential Oil – Dilute to a maximum of 2% in in any carrier oil (10 drops per tablespoon) and apply to the skin.

    If you find the carrier oils too heating, you can mix the essential oil(s) into an unscented personal care product.


    Disclaimer: The statements made on this page have not been evaluated by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). They are not intended to diagnose, cure or prevent any disease. If a condition persists, please contact your physician or healthcare provider. The information provided is not a substitute for a face-to-face consultation with a healthcare provider, and should not be construed as medical advice.



    This video is by the founder of Amrita Aromatherapy and master aromatherapist Christoph Streicher, Ph.D.


    Learn more about aromatherapy or see our how to use essential oil videos.

  • About the Condition

    What Is Hyperhidrosis?


    Perspiration is a normal function of the body. It allows the body to cool itself down. But when the amount of sweat far outweighs the amount the body needs to produce to achieve this goal, this is what is classed as “excessive sweating,” or hyperhidrosis.

    For example, if you are sweating profusely and you have not exerted yourself and it is not hot weather and you don’t have a fever or anxiety, it could be that you are suffering from hyperhidrosis.

    Hyperhidrosis can be either localized or generalized. Localized hyperhidrosis (also called “primary focal”) is the more common variety and around 1 to 3% of the population suffers from it. It usually starts in childhood or adolescence and affects specific parts of the body. It doesn’t cause an illness. Generalized hyperhidrosis (also called “secondary general”) causes sweating all over the body, sometimes at night.


    What Causes Hyperhidrosis?

    Excessive sweating can be caused by various medications.

    Localized hyperhidrosis is more common in people who are overweight or in poor physical condition.

    Generalized hyperhidrosis is caused by an underlying medical condition such as menopause, pregnancy, thyroid problems, diabetes, alcoholism, Parkinson's disease, auto-immune diseases, stroke, heart failure, some types of cancer and infectious diseases like tuberculosis.

    If you suspect you may be suffering from excessive sweating, you should seek medical advice so that you can rule out any underlying cause.


    Disclaimer: The statements made on this page have not been evaluated by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). They are not intended to diagnose, cure or prevent any disease. If a condition persists, please contact your physician or healthcare provider. The information provided is not a substitute for a face-to-face consultation with a healthcare provider, and should not be construed as medical advice.

  • Other Treatments

    What Are Conventional Medical Treatments For Excessive Sweating?


    For generalized hyperhidrosis, doctors mainly aim to find out the cause of it. For localized hyperhidrosis, doctors generally recommend antiperspirants (over the counter or prescribed). In severe cases, they can also recommend Iontophoresis – which uses low-level electrical impulses to temporarily disable the sweat glands – or medications, Botox or surgery to affect the sweat glands or the nerves that trigger them.


    What Are Alternative Treatments For Excessive Sweating?

    There are a number of homeopathic remedies, and some believe taking vinegar and apple cider vinegar can help. Others say cutting gluten from their diet, drinking wheatgrass juice or taking sage tea or sage tablets, St. John’s Wort, chamomile or valerian root can also help. Stress reduction techniques or acupuncture may benefit some. It is a very individual condition, so it is a matter of finding what works for you. And, of course, essential oils can be used for excessive sweating. See the Useful Essential Oils tab for more information.


    Disclaimer: The statements made on this page have not been evaluated by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). They are not intended to diagnose, cure or prevent any disease. If a condition persists, please contact your physician or healthcare provider. The information provided is not a substitute for a face-to-face consultation with a healthcare provider, and should not be construed as medical advice.

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