Essential Oils For Nausea And Vomiting

  • Useful Essential Oils

    Which essential oils are useful for nausea and vomiting?


    The following essential oils traditionally have been used for nausea and vomiting:

    • Peppermint – Directly inhale from a diffuser, or when traveling, add a few drops on a tissue, or 1 drop on the tongue. Safety Precautions: Peppermint is non-toxic and non-irritant, except in concentration. The menthol contained in Peppermint is a dermal irritant, so avoid contact with eyes, skin and mucus membranes. May cause sensitization in some individuals. It is a stimulating oil; therefore, it is not advised for use in the evening or at bedtime, as it may cause insomnia. Peppermint oil should not be used on children who are 3 years of age or younger.
    • Cornmint – Directly inhale from a diffuser or, when traveling, place a few drops on a tissue, or 1 drop on the tongue.


    Learn more about aromatherapy or see our how to use essential oil videos.


    Disclaimer: The statements made on this page have not been evaluated by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). They are not intended to diagnose, cure or prevent any disease. If a condition persists, please contact your physician or healthcare provider. The information provided is not a substitute for a face-to-face consultation with a healthcare provider, and should not be construed as medical advice.

  • About the Condition

    What Is Nausea?


    Nausea is the queasiness of the stomach that generally precedes bouts of vomiting. It is a symptom of another condition.


    What Causes Nausea?

    According to WebMD, nausea can be caused by many conditions, such as:<.p>

    • Travel sickness
    • Food poisoning
    • Pregnancy (early stages)
    • Severe pain
    • Stress
    • Infections such as the flu
    • Concussion
    • Diseases of the gallbladder, meningitis, ulcers, some types of cancer, brain tumors, heart attacks and so on
    • Medications.

    Disclaimer: The statements made on this page have not been evaluated by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). They are not intended to diagnose, cure or prevent any disease. If a condition persists, please contact your physician or healthcare provider. The information provided is not a substitute for a face-to-face consultation with a healthcare provider, and should not be construed as medical advice.

  • Other Treatments

    What Are Conventional Medical Treatments For Nausea?


    The treatment depends on the cause of the nausea. It is generally best to treat the underlying cause. The age of the person and timing of the nausea in relation to events like eating can give some clues. For example, some types of food poisoning have effects one to eight hours after a meal. Others, like salmonella, can take longer to take effect.

    Dehydration after vomiting is a major concern, especially with children who may not be aware that they need to replace their fluids. If there is also diarrhea, this is even more likely to occur.

    You should always consult a doctor if there is excessive or recurring vomiting, even if you know the cause. Young children need attention earlier on than adults. You should seek immediate medical help if there is blood in the vomit or if there are other symptoms accompanying the vomiting such as confusion, severe abdominal pain, a severe headache or stiff neck, rapid breathing, a faster pulse or diarrhea.

    Regardless of what caused the nausea, sitting or lying in a propped position rather than moving can help. Some people find sipping non-acidic liquids can help prevent vomiting.

    If you feel nauseous, it is generally best not to eat until it passes. If you do vomit, make sure you drink lots of water and avoid eating solid food until you are sure you are over it. If there is vomiting and diarrhea lasting more than 24 hours, doctors generally recommend that you take a rehydrating solution.


    What Are Alternative Treatments For Nausea?

    Ginger tablets (taken the night before you travel) are thought to help prevent nausea from motion sickness. Taking raw ginger half an hour before a meal can also help your digestion. Some people find drinking mint tea helps reduce nausea. Acupuncture and acupressure may also help some types of nausea. Of course, essential oils may help. See the Useful Essential Oils tab for more information.


    Disclaimer: The statements made on this page have not been evaluated by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). They are not intended to diagnose, cure or prevent any disease. If a condition persists, please contact your physician or healthcare provider. The information provided is not a substitute for a face-to-face consultation with a healthcare provider, and should not be construed as medical advice.

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