Essential Oils For Runner's Knee

  • Useful Essential Oils

    Which essential oils are useful for runner's knee?


    Helichrysum has traditionally been used for runner's knees. For the greatest effectiveness, dilute it 2% in Rosehip Seed Oil or flax seed oil (10 drops per tablespoon) before applying it to affected areas.

    Learn more about aromatherapy or see our how to use essential oil videos.


    Disclaimer: The statements made on this page have not been evaluated by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). They are not intended to diagnose, cure or prevent any disease. If a condition persists, please contact your physician or healthcare provider. The information provided is not a substitute for a face-to-face consultation with a healthcare provider, and should not be construed as medical advice.

  • About The Condition

    What Is Runner’s Knee?

    Runner’s knee isn’t actually a specific condition. It is a common name for a number of disorders that can have different causes. It’s common amongst runners and any sports and activities that involve a lot of knee-bending. Generally, it is associated with an aching pain around the kneecap, but sometimes there can also be swelling and popping or grinding sensations in the knee. It is also called patellofemoral pain syndrome.

    What Causes Runner’s Knee?

    Runner's knee can be caused by:

    • Direct trauma to the knee – e.g. caused by a fall or by it being hit.
    • Overuse – e.g. doing too many lunges.
    • Malalignment – e.g. the kneecap itself being slightly out of position.
    • Weak thigh muscles or muscle imbalance – puts more load in the knees themselves).
    • Problems with the feet – e.g. hypermobile feet, where the feet move more than is normal, flat feet or fallen arches.

    Disclaimer: The statements made on this page have not been evaluated by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). They are not intended to diagnose, cure or prevent any disease. If a condition persists, please contact your physician or healthcare provider. The information provided is not a substitute for a face-to-face consultation with a healthcare provider, and should not be construed as medical advice.

  • Other Treatments

    What Are Conventional Medical Treatments For Runner’s Knee?

    When runner’s knee isn’t severe, often it will resolve itself with rest. Here are some steps to take. The first four are the basic RICE:

    • Rest the knee. Avoid putting weight on it.
    • Ice your knee for 20-30 minutes every 3-4 hours for 2-3 days, or until the pain is gone. This will help reduce pain and swelling.
    • Compress your knee using an elastic bandage, patellar straps, or sleeves. This will help to give it more support.
    • Elevate your knee.
    • Physical Therapy: Stretching and strengthening exercises, especially for the quadriceps muscle group may help.
    • Medications: Many doctors would also prescribe anti-inflammatory medications like nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. However, like all drugs they have side-effects.
    • Arch supports or orthotics can sometimes help, if appropriate.

    For severe cases of runner's knee, surgery may be required.

    What Are Alternative Treatments For Runner’s Knee?

    Some people find the following treatments helpful in addition to the methods mentioned above:

    • Taking anti-inflammatory foods and supplements such as ginger and garlic
    • Herbal supplements such as arnica, bromelain, devil's claw and white willow bark
    • Homeopathic remedies
    • Sports massage
    • Chiropractic treatment
    • Acupunture.

    Some people also recommend these options as ways to prevent runner’s knee.

    In terms of prevention, some recommend alternating activities that require a lot of stress on the knee with other forms of exercise (e.g. yoga, weight training, etc).

    Of course, essential oils traditionally have also been used to help with the body’s repair of runner’s knee. See the Useful Essential Oils tab for details.


    Disclaimer: The statements made on this page have not been evaluated by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). They are not intended to diagnose, cure or prevent any disease. If a condition persists, please contact your physician or healthcare provider. The information provided is not a substitute for a face-to-face consultation with a healthcare provider, and should not be construed as medical advice.


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