Essential Oils For Vertigo

  • Useful Essential Oils

    Which essential oils are effective for vertigo?


    The following essential oils have traditionally been used for vertigo:

    If you experience nausea as a result of your vertigo, you may find the Essential Oils For Nausea And Vomiting page useful.

    Learn more about aromatherapy or see our how to use essential oil videos.


    Disclaimer: The statements made on this page have not been evaluated by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). They are not intended to diagnose, cure or prevent any disease. If a condition persists, please contact your physician or healthcare provider. The information provided is not a substitute for a face-to-face consultation with a healthcare provider, and should not be construed as medical advice.

  • About The Condition

    What Is Vertigo?


    Vertigo is when you physically feel like you are unbalanced, whirling or spinning, even though you aren’t. It is a giddy sensation. Sometimes people even feel nauseated by it.


    What Causes Vertigo?

    According to WebMD, vertigo can be caused by:

    • Inner ear disorders (this is the most common cause). This is because the inner ear is responsible for sending the brain messages about the location of the body in space relative to gravity. It is part of what helps you keep your balance. For example:
      • Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo (BPPV) is when calcium particles clump together in canals of the inner ear. The reason for this happening is not yet known and can happen at any age.
      • Meniere's disease is thought to be caused by a buildup of fluid and changing pressure in the ear. It can cause vertigo, ringing in the ears (tinnitus) and hearing loss.
      • Vestibular neuritis or labyrinthitis is usually related to infection (usually viral) which causes inflammation around nerves that are important for helping the body sense balance.
    • Neck or head injuries.
    • Brain damage caused by strokes or tumors.
    • Medications that have damaged the ear.
    • Migraines.

    Disclaimer: The statements made on this page have not been evaluated by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). They are not intended to diagnose, cure or prevent any disease. If a condition persists, please contact your physician or healthcare provider. The information provided is not a substitute for a face-to-face consultation with a healthcare provider, and should not be construed as medical advice.

  • Other Treatments

    What Are Conventional Medical Treatments For Vertigo?


    The treatment depends on the cause of the vertigo. It is generally best to treat the underlying cause. Sometimes, it goes away without the need for treatment as the body adapts to changes in the inner ear.

    Sometimes, a type of physical therapy called vestibular rehabilitation is useful. Canalith repositioning maneuvers like the Epley Maneuver, The Semont Maneuver or the Half Somersault or Foster Maneuver can be useful for BPPV, as the movements can help move the calcium deposits. Your doctor may be able to show you how to do them. Sometimes medications are prescribed to help with any nausea associated with the vertigo. For vertigo caused by infection or inflammation, antibiotics or steroids are often prescribed. For vertigo caused by Meniere's disease, sometimes diuretics are prescribed to reduce pressure from fluid buildup. As with all medications, there are often side effects. When the vertigo is caused by a medication, changing medications can help. Sometimes, surgery is required.


    What Are Alternative Treatments For Vertigo?

    Some believe that vertigo is associated with high blood sugar and high cholesterol levels, so reducing sugar and cholesterol in the diet as appropriate may help. Others say drinking more water, taking Gingko biloba, Valerian, DHEA supplements, homeopathic remedies or Chinese herbs can help. Of course, essential oils may help. See the Useful Essential Oils tab for more information.


    Disclaimer: The statements made on this page have not been evaluated by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). They are not intended to diagnose, cure or prevent any disease. If a condition persists, please contact your physician or healthcare provider. The information provided is not a substitute for a face-to-face consultation with a healthcare provider, and should not be construed as medical advice.

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