Essential Oils For Anxiety and Stress

  • Useful Essential Oils

    Which essential oils are effective for anxiety and stress?


    As explained in the videos below, the essential oils contained in the following products have traditionally been used for stress and anxiety:

    A concrete example: You are lying in bed and can’t sleep. Put your attention on your body. You will notice that there is unrest in one part. Stay with it. Apply Deep Rest Roll-On Relief on this part. Continue to stay with it. Notice how your mind, your body and the essential oil blend work together. Have a good night!

    In the same way, Quit Craving Roll-On Relief is a helpful tool. Don’t use it like Western medicine. If you use it to explore yourself, it will help you solve your problem.

    The Roll-On Relief line of products: Anxiety Free, A Woman's Balance, Menopause and Stress Free can be used in a similar way. These products were designed for ease of use, and for immediate relief from different stress responses.

    The essential oils that may help temporarily alleviate the symptoms of stress of any kind are:

    • Lavender Essential Oil – Diffuse or dilute 5% in carrier oil (25 drops per tablespoon), or dilute and use in an aromatic bath.
    • Roman Chamomile Essential Oil – Diffuse or dilute to 5-10% in jojoba or hazelnut oil (25-50 drops per tablespoon) and apply on the heart and chest area or dilute and use in an aromatic bath.
    • Ylang Ylang Essential Oil – Diffuse it.
    • Myrrh Essential Oil – Diffuse or dilute to 2% in carrier oil (10 drops per tablespoon) and apply on those areas of the body where you feel your anxiety is located or dilute and use in an aromatic bath.
    • Neroli Essential Oil – Dilute to 2% in carrier oil (10 drops per tablespoon) and apply on those areas of the body where you feel your anxiety is located.
    • Geranium Essential Oil – Diffuse, or dilute up to 5% in jojoba or hazelnut oil (25 drops per tablespoon) and massage into the whole body or down the frontal line (which runs from the heart area upwards and downwards - extending from the front of the neck to the pubic bone, parallel to the spine) or dilute and use in an aromatic bath.
    • Bergamot Essential Oil – Diffuse or dilute up to 1% in carrier oil (2 drops per tablespoon) and apply on the heart and chest area or dilute and use in an aromatic bath.

    Note: Some of these aren't mentioned in the video. There are also essential oils that are said to work on specific issues, like muscle tension, grief or insomnia.

    You may like to try Anxiety Free Synergy. To temporarily alleviate the symptoms of anxiety, diffuse it or dilute it 3-5% in any carrier oil (15-25 drops per tablespoon) and apply on the heart and chest area or do a whole body massage, or dilute it and use it in an aromatic bath. If you are feeling “stressed out” you could just dilute it and massage it down your frontal line which runs from the heart area upwards and downwards - extending from the front of the neck to the pubic bone, parallel to the spine.

    Some have also found Ylang Ylang perfume and Mandarine Sunset Synergy also useful for stress and anxiety. Diffuse it or dilute to 5% in any carrier oil (25 drops per tablespoon) and apply on the heart and chest area. Do not use this if you have particularly sensitive skin.

    You may also find this aromatherapy essential oil anxiety blend useful. You may also like to read this Dealing With Fear, Stress And Anxiety blog.

    See here for advice on what to do for teenage anxiety and anxiety in dogs.

    For other issues, see Essential Oils To Balance Emotions.

    This video (and the one below) is by the founder of Amrita Aromatherapy and master aromatherapist Christoph Streicher, Ph.D.


    Learn more about aromatherapy or see our how to use essential oil videos.


    Disclaimer: The statements made on this page have not been evaluated by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). They are not intended to diagnose, cure or prevent any disease. If a condition persists, please contact your physician or healthcare provider. The information provided is not a substitute for a face-to-face consultation with a healthcare provider, and should not be construed as medical advice.

  • About the Condition

    What is anxiety? What is stress?


    Anxiety and stress are both normal human emotions that everyone experiences at one time or another. However, when these emotions interfere with your ability to lead a normal life, they then become considered "anxiety disorders" or "stress disorders."

    Stress is defined as how your brain responds to a demand. The "stress response" as it is known, affects the body in that it generates reactions to allow you to deal with the demand. For example, it prepares you to be able to flee the situation or to defend yourself, depending on the situation. As part of its reaction, our body releases epinephrine (adrenaline) from the adrenal glands.

    The problem comes when our modern-day lives present demands that are not the sort of demands that require a physical response. Our bodies don't seem to quite know how to react. And having epinephrine and the stress hormone cortisol regularly circulating through our bodies can cause health problems in the long term.

    However, being stressed isn't considered a medical condition, whereas anxiety disorders are and they are very common - in fact they are the most common mental disorder in America. Anxiety is considered more akin to fear than to stress. Generally an anxiety disorder is diagnosed when the fear is interfering with your normal life, or if it seems to develop without any real cause.

    There a variety of anxiety disorders such as generalized anxiety disorder, panic disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), separation anxiety, and so on.

    What causes anxiety?

    The exact cause is not known. But research seems to indicate that it's caused by a combination of factors, such as changes in the brain and environmental stress. There does appear to be some genetic component in terms of our susceptibility to it.

    Research has shown that long-lasting or severe stress can change the way nerve cells within the brain transmit information from one region to another. Other research studies have shown that people with specific anxiety disorders have changes in the parts of their brains that control memories linked with strong emotions.


    Disclaimer: The statements made on this page have not been evaluated by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). They are not intended to diagnose, cure or prevent any disease. If a condition persists, please contact your physician or healthcare provider. The information provided is not a substitute for a face-to-face consultation with a healthcare provider, and should not be construed as medical advice.

  • Other Treatments

    What are conventional medical treatments for anxiety and stress?


    The treatment prescribed depends on the type of anxiety disorder. One or more of the following therapies may be used:

    • Medications such as anti-depressants and anxiety-reducing drugs
    • Psychotherapy to talk through strategies to help develop better emotional responses to stress
    • Cognitive-behavioral therapy to help people to recognize and change thought patterns and behaviors that lead to the anxiety
    • Dietary and lifestyle changes
    • Relaxation therapy to help people reduce stress.

    Alternative treatments for anxiety and stress?

    Some research has been conducted on some herbal products. But you have to check with your doctor to make sure they don't conflict with your other medications.

    Kava initially appeared promising but there have been reports of it causing serious liver damage so it has been banned in many countries. Valerian has had mixed results from various studies. Some people find it helps reduce their anxiety. But consult your doctor before using it. Passionflower has been shown to be useful by a few small clinical trials. But some studies have found it can cause drowsiness, dizziness and confusion. Theanine amino acid (found in green tea and in some supplements) has been shown to make some people feel calmer, but there is limited evidence that it helps treat anxiety.

    Some people find meditation techniques, mindfulness, yoga and breathing techniques useful for reducing stress and anxiety.

    And of course, essential oils have also been used for anxiety and stress. For more information, see the Useful Essential Oils tab.


    Disclaimer: The statements made on this page have not been evaluated by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). They are not intended to diagnose, cure or prevent any disease. If a condition persists, please contact your physician or healthcare provider. The information provided is not a substitute for a face-to-face consultation with a healthcare provider, and should not be construed as medical advice.

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